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Alberta Amateur Baseball Council

Slammin’ Ty Scott doing it all for NAIA’s Lions

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Since being named to the 2020 All-Canadian College Team by the Canadian Baseball Network in December, Calgary’s Ty Scott has been giving pitchers a rough time.

Scott is a senior for the Bryan College Lions, an NAIA club that plays out of Dayton, Tennessee. As of late March, he was hitting at a .379 clip, with six home runs, 20 runs batted in and 10 stolen bases in 29 games. The stats are impressive for a middle infielder, but his coaches think his defensive abilities are even more his forte.

The 22-year-old Scott attributes his success to his emphasis on being mentally prepared. He has tried to develop an inner narrative of short, concise, positive thoughts that he uses when hitting or on the field. He feels his mental approach has helped him eliminate negative thinking and move his play forward at all times. Dealing with failure in a productive way has been his key to success as a collegiate player.

Scott listens to podcasts to help him with his mental preparedness. He likes to listen to military/special forces podcasts as a primary resource for learning. He believes the emphasis on training by military personnel allows them to operate successfully in even the most stressful situations and has tried to adopt some of their ideas into his baseball. Scott cites Josh Hoetmer, sports psychologist for the Vauxhall Jets, as being another support pillar in his development. Scott – a Calgary Bucks graduate who also played for Vauxhall – believes trust in your training is crucial during the tough times all athletes inevitably face.

Scott’s best baseball experiences come from the friendships he has made while playing the sport. He also takes great pride in being part of a Lions team that finished first in the Appalachian Athletic Conference. His greatest disappointment was his sophomore year when he became too concerned about the results, as opposed to putting greater emphasis on the process of becoming a better player.

For Scott, not making Alberta’s 2015 Canada Cup team is another regret but he focused on turning that disappointment into something positive. Through constructive thinking, he went on to have a great summer baseball season that same year.

In the future, Scott hopes to get a shot at professional baseball. If not, he would love to come back to Alberta to help continue to grow the sport in his home province.

Alberta Amateur Baseball Council

Oikawa, Ianetti latest AABC weekly Honorees

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Alberta Amateur Baseball Council is recognizing those individuals who have contributed to significantly to Alberta baseball, at the youth level.

Nominees for the past two weeks, regarding “Passion for Baseball”, are Scott Oikawa, of the Lethbridge American Legion program and Dutche Iannetti of the Fort McMurray Minor Baseball program.

Oikawa played in the Picture Butte and Lethbridge Little League programs, and later competed in the Lethbridge Legion program. Once his playing days were done, he became a coach in the Lethbridge American Legion program.

Scott’s interest in baseball started by coming from a baseball family. His parents, Mary and Tricky, were avid supporters of youth baseball in the Lethbridge and Picture Butte area (the Lethbridge Elks hold an annual tournament named after Mary in appreciation of her volunteerism). Mary and Tricky impressed upon Scott the need to give back to the game after enjoying it for several years. Regarding his mentors, he gained some knowledge and perspectives from each one of the coaches he had as a youth baseball player in the Lethbridge area. Scott would like extend his gratitude towards his co-coaches Jim Kotkas and Chad Layton; he feels they are both good teachers and have great baseball minds. Today, he is inspired by getting a chance to work young people as a baseball coach.

Scott Oikawa, Lethbridge American Legion Program

Scott is proudest when he sees his past players, and realizes how much they have grown as individuals. He is extremely pleased to see them contribute to the Lethbridge Elks or Miners’ programs, but even more satisfied to see them become good citizens and positive contributors to society.

He is also proud of coaching one of the top Alberta U18 programs called the Lethbridge Elks. Scott is honoured that the Lethbridge Elks are a program that is well-known in Alberta, but also throughout Montana and the Pacific Northwest.

Regarding the future of Alberta youth baseball, Scott would like to see the sport continue to grow in numbers, and steady improvement regarding player skill sets. He also appreciates it when coaches emphasize teamwork and good citizenship, when fulfilling their duties as a youth baseball instructor.

Scott also hopes that coaches remember, their best coaching jobs may not be reflected in the win/loss ratio; it is shown by your approach when working with players, and how you help them to grow as players and people.

Ianetti has served on the Fort McMurray executive, and coached several Fort McMurray teams. As well, he has rolled up his sleeves and been part of facility maintenance groups.

Dutche interest in baseball stems from being a participant in many Cape Breton Little League teams, growing up in Nova Scotia. He really liked the game, and cites his youth coaches, Monte Bradley and Billy Foster, as being positive influences regarding his love of the sport. In Fort McMurray, his children, Joey, Josh, and Felicia, motivated him to get involved in Fort McMurray Minor Baseball. The entire family enjoyed the travel and competition that youth baseball provided. As an adult, he would like to acknowledge Jerry McPherson as person who convinced him to get more involved in youth baseball; he is happy for Jerry’s encouragement.

Dutche Iannetti, Fort McMurray Minor Baseball Association

Dutche is proud of all the new relationships that evolved from his association with youth baseball. He has made great friends in his community, but also throughout the province. Baseball has enhanced his social network. Dutche also is very satisfied that he has the capacity to give back to his community, through his volunteerism regarding youth baseball.

In the future, Dutche would like all baseball associations to “get on the same page” when it comes youth players. The emphasis should be on what is best for the kids, not individual associations. Check egos at the door, and step it up for deserving kids, not your geographical location. As well, coaches need to try and move kids forward, no matter what their starting level of skills are. .

The Alberta Amateur Baseball Council, and the Alberta baseball community would like to thank both Scott and Dutche for their dedication and efforts towards Alberta youth baseball.

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Baseball Alberta

Baseball Alberta Seeks New Program Coordinator

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The Baseball Alberta Programs Coordinator role is a comprehensive, multi-faceted role with broad responsibilities for baseball program administration and delivery in Alberta. Reporting to the Executive Director with ultimate accountability to the Board of Directors of Baseball Alberta, this role will be based out of the Baseball Alberta Edmonton office working as part of a team of employees focused on serving the member Associations of the province in developing, administering, and growing the sport of baseball in Alberta.

Application deadline is January 31, 2022.

FOR FULL JOB DESCRIPTION and to apply on line via INDEED, CLICK HERE

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Alberta Amateur Baseball Council

AABC Weekly Passion for Baseball Honors to Garry Thomson

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Alberta Amateur Baseball Council is recognizing those individuals who have contributed significantly to Alberta baseball, at the youth level. This week’s nominee, regarding “Passion for Baseball”, is Garry Thomson. Garry has coached and umpired for the Brownfield, Coronation, and Castor minor baseball organizations for decades.

In his youth, Garry was inspired by softball, not baseball. Once Garry moved to Brownfield, the strong minor baseball program motivated him to join their ranks. Garry began a teaching career in the Brownfield area, and once his kids were old enough to start playing, he became more involved directly with the local youth programs. All his boys played baseball in the East Central Alberta area, and today, he has grandkids playing for the same local programs.

Garry cites Coach Carter Stickler, of the Consort area, as a coach who had a very positive impact on him regarding baseball, and sport in general. He also would like to recognize Terry Schneider and Dan Buskas, as great mentors, in his involvement and development as an umpire.

Garry is proudest of his role as being a facilitator/supporter of baseball in East Central Alberta. He takes great satisfaction that his kids, and grandkids, have all had the opportunity to participate in quality local minor baseball programs. Garry is also very pleased with the relationships he has formed with people all over the province as an umpire and coach. He is humbled that he is still asked to umpire, as he was this past summer, even as he gets a little older.

Garry hopes that baseball numbers continue to grow throughout the province. He wants baseball to remain a friendly, fun, and affordable sport for all. He feels baseball helps build relationships throughout Alberta; baseball, he credits, as being a great sport for the fans as well. He wants all baseball enthusiasts to remember, a) baseball is supposed to be fun, b) it is important to show sportsmanship, c) play hard and winning is a bonus at the end of the game.

Alberta Amateur Baseball Council, and the Alberta baseball community would like to thank Garry for his volunteerism and commitment towards Alberta youth baseball

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